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.s. taxpayer money has been indirectly funneled to the taliban under a $2.16 billion, a $2 billion transportation contract. this is crazy. it should not be part of the job of the u.s. military to promote afghan businesses. this report found, quote, documented credible evidence of involvement in a criminal enterprise of support for the enemy, unquote. this is ridiculous. and it comes on the heels of a report last week that the navy has spent at least $300 million, at least $300 million, on two ships that were never completed, never sent on a mission, and are now headed for a salvage yard in brownsville, texas. are there no fiscal conservatives at the pentagon? and sadly, most people in congress today are afraid to cut the defense department for fear they will appear to be unpatriotic. and yet it seems to me, mr. speaker, that it's unpatriotic to continue with megabillions and wasteful spending, or billions in spending that promote businesses in other countries. no part of the federal government should be immune from having to save taxpayer money. the american people would be far bet
is training eventual new members of the taliban. he further stated, trainers are doing a wonderful job but we don't have the time to make an army or police force in afghanistan. the general closed his email to me by saying this, every day someone dies. every day someone dies. it is time to bring our troopings home from -- troops home from afghanistan. how many more children have to cry in a mom or dad's grave site because their mother or daddy went to afghanistan to prop up a corrupt leader named karzai that we send $10 billion a month to? i hope no other children have to cry like edy and stephanie. that brings me to my close, mr. speaker. several weeks oak eugene robertson in his editorial titled "afghanistan strategy, let's go." we wanted to kill or capture osama bin laden, and we did. even so, say the hawks, we have to stay in afghanistan because of the dangerous instability across the border in nuclear armed pakistan. but does anyone believe the war in afghanistan has made pakistan more safe? no, it has not. in fact, it's more fragile now than it's ever been. the threat from afghanistan i
members of the taliban. trainers are doing a wonderful job but we don't have the time to make an army. and, mr. speaker, then, it was kind of sad the way he closed. every day somebody from our country dies. a marine, a soldier, an airman, navy, whatever. mr. speaker, i bring posters on the floor. i have probably 12 now that i want to bring on the floor every time that i speak to remind the house that there's pain in war. the wife to my left on the poster is in tears. the little girl who's about 2 years of age, she doesn't understand why this army officer is kneeling before her with a folded flag. but, yet, i will say to the little girl, when you grow older and you are old enough to know your daddy was a real hero, sergeant jeffrey shear, who gave his life for this country. mr. speaker, that leaves me to sharing with the house an editorial that was written about four weeks ago by eugene robinson and the title is "afghanistan strategy: let's go," and i want to read from his editorial. slinder threads of hope are nice, but they do not constitute a plan, nor do they justify continuing to pour
of every six department of defense dollars is going to afghanistan. we got the taliban out of power. karzai stood for free elections in 2004. al qaeda was dismantled and sent into western pakistan. this is not a nation-building exercise. this is a counter-terror exercise. we do not need 100,000 troops on the ground of the cost we're paying today in order to get the job done. [applause] thank you. i am here to tell you the future of the united states is not going to be determined in the prairies of afghanistan. the future of the united states is going to be determined by how well-prepared we are to compete in a highly competitive 21st century. that battle will be waged across the pacific ocean. we have some work to do. as you walk out of this building, i want you to remember why we're in this race. it is because it is about the generation and we're about to pass the country to and the condition in which they will find it. my priorities will be debt and spending. we have no choice. trajectory we're on is unsustainable. launching a new industrial revolution is within our grasp. it has happened
to the taliban we were going to withdraw. while they may not have watches, they do have calendars. [laughter] you drive them away if they know they only have to hideout for a certain time. i think of -- i think that was a mistake on his part. i think he should have made sure that the public elections were held in such a way that there was public confidence. i think there are lessons learned. one is, we have been there 10 years. id is time for the afghan people to be able to take responsibility -- it is time for the afghan people to take responsibility for there own safety that has been fought for so valiantly by our soldiers. we do want to see the afghans pick up the responsibility for the effort that goes for word. in the determination of when to pull our troops out should come as a result of the input of the people closest to the battlefield, the generals and the leaders on the ground. at the president should be listening more to them as david cameron in the u.k. did. >> i know you do not agree with the method we got into all there. now that we are there, do we need to stay in libya until colon
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5